Augmented Reality

Imagine a school library where books display videos of book reviews by students in the school or a bulletin board that not only displays student art but engages visitors during parent-teacher conferences by playing clips of learners talking about their work.

These are two examples of how educators are using an augmented reality (AR) app to engage and support students and visitors in their schools around the world. If it’s hard to imagine, watch how a school in the UK has implemented the technology.

In March during the ESOL Methods course, Cohort 3 of Webster’s grant-funded ESOL Certification program test drove Aurasma – the AR app compatible with iOS and Android devices – to create an enhanced word wall.

With iPads provided by the grant, they recorded classmates using 9th grade environmental science terms in their own words. Then they created signs for the word wall, snapped photos of each, and merged the photos and videos in Aurasma to create the end product of the project – auras. Auras enable students to open the app on a device and hover it over words on the wall to watch video clips of classmates using the terms.

The cohort learned that, as with most new tools, there is a small learning curve to travel before implementing AR apps in a K-12 classroom. With Aurasma, start by becoming familiar with the lingo – videos are called “overlays,” and pictures are called “triggers.” Create a channel for your students to subscribe to, and make sure the lighting in your classroom is sufficient to produce acceptable trigger images, or plan to create the trigger images in advance.

Learn more from a variety of tutorials on the web. The video below explains how to use Aurasma with your mobile device. If you decide to use the app regularly, consider building your auras with the Aurasma Studio website. Other useful tutorials include Aurasma’s guide for educators and various blog posts. Then, explore ways to use other AR apps to engage your learners.

Advertisements
Posted in iPad Apps, Technology Resources

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: